INSTITUTE FACULTY

The Institute for Digital Archaeology Method and Practice brings together a variety of highly respected and skilled faculty members from both inside and outside of the archaeological community.  Faculty will teach, lead workshops, lead discussion sessions, and mentor institute attendees as they design, develop, and deploy their capstone digital archaeological project over the course of the institute.

Terry Peterkin Brock

Terry Peterkin Brock

Research Archaeologist at the Montpelier Foundation

Terry Brock currently serves as the Research Archaeologist at the Montpelier Foundation as part of their public and historical archaeology department, where he directs field projects and public archaeology programs. He received his PhD in Anthropology from Michigan State University in 2014, where he began working at the intersection of digital social media and public archaeology. His experience includes developing and implementing one of the earliest social media plans for a public archaeology program for the MSU Campus Archaeology Program. Since then, he has presented at major archaeological conferences on the use of the social web to conduct public archaeology, developed an online exhibit on his dissertation research, and has consulted with heritage organizations in developing strategies for implementing social media. Among these organizations include the Society for Historical Archaeology and the Fairfield Foundation. Currently, he sits on the Board of Directors for Archaeology in the Community, and is a co-founder of RVA Archaeology in Richmond, Virginia.

terrypbrock.com

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at NYU. She is author of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) and of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television (Vanderbilt University Press, 2006). She is co-founder of the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, where she has led a number of experiments in open peer review and other innovations in scholarly publishing.

plannedobsolescence.net

Catherine Foley

Catherine Foley

Digital Librarian at Matrix: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University

Catherine Foley is a digital librarian at Matrix: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University. She has a BA in History from Wesleyan University and a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Kentucky. Foley has expertise in metadata standards and digital repositories. She manages several Africa-related multimedia digital library projects involving collaborators from universities in North America and Africa. These projects include: the Community Video Education Trust digital archive (cvet.org.za); Diversity and Tolerance in the Islam of West Africa (aodl.org/islamictolerance); African Oral Narratives: life histories, interviews, folklore & song from sub-Saharan Africa (aodl.org/oralnarratives); and Biographies: The Atlantic Slave Data Network (slavebiographies.org). Foley also manages the American Black Journal Archive (abj.matrix.msu.edu), a digital library of an historic television program produced and broadcast weekly by Detroit Public Television since 1968. She is currently coordinating the development of an NEH-funded digital archive of over 100,000 photographic negatives by four photographers from Mali, West Africa.

Brian Geyer

Brian Geyer

Research Assistant, LEADR

Brian Geyer is a 4th year PhD student of anthropology at Michigan State University. His research regards the adaptive strategies Maa-speaking peoples undertake to adjust their land tenure customs to rapidly changing wildlife conservation practices near the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. He was a Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship recipient for the first three years of his graduate studies, a Fulbright-Hays Group Project Abroad member for a language program in Tanzania, and – prior to his graduate studies – served as a public health volunteer in Kenya through the United States Peace Corps. He has BAs in music and anthropology from Washington State University.

Brian currently serves as a research assistant for theLab for the Education and Advancement in Digital Research (LEADR), a joint program between the departments of history and anthropology. His duties involve collaboration with faculty regarding digital projects, instruction of undergraduates in digital tools relevant to those projects, and advisement to graduate students and faculty members on digital research projects. He has also completed two projects as a member of the anthropology department’s Cultural Heritage Informatics Fellowship. His first is Kenya-Tweet, which is an (almost) real-time geospatial tweet mapping project (kenya-tweet.matrix.msu.edu). His second, Remnants of Slavery, is a 3D visualization project involving several scanned archaeological objects from Gorée Island off the coast of Mali (remnantsofslavery.matrix.msu.edu).

Shawn Graham

Shawn Graham

Associate Professor in the History Department at Carleton University

Shawn Graham is an associate professor in the history department at Carleton University. His digital archaeological work involves the use of small-scale agent based models to explore Roman social space, 3d photogrammetry for teaching & public outreach with museums, and data mining to see what can be squeezed from archaeological data sets. He blogs at electricarchaeology.ca and is all over twitter as @electricarchaeo. Currently he is teaching a seminar on the illegal antiquities trade (from a data mining perspective), and a course on digital research methods for historians.

electricarchaeology.ca/

Eric Kansa

Eric Kansa

Director of Open Context

Eric Kansa directs Open Context (http://opencontext.org) a data publishing venue for archaeology. His research interests explore web architecture, service design and how these issues relate to the social and professional context of the digital humanities and social sciences. He also researches policy issues relating to intellectual property, including text-mining and cultural property concerns, and actively participates in a number of Open Science, Open Government, cyberinfrastructure, text mining and scholarly user needs initiatives. In June 2013, the White House recognized Eric as a “Champion of Change” for his efforts in promoting Open Science.

 

Daniel Pett

Daniel Pett

Daniel joined the British Museum in 2003 after a career in telecommunications and Investment Banking. He is responsible for the delivery of the award-winning Portable Antiquities Scheme website and is currently working on wide array of digital public archaeology projects including the Day of Archaeology, Nomisma, Project Andvari and MicroPasts (crowdsourcing and crowdfunding). He was also involved in the British Museum website refreshment project (2006), performing the duties of Secretary of the Web Steering Group until the project was delivered. He is an Honorary Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, teaching on the Museum Studies, Conservation and Public Archaeology MA programmes where he has supervised 1 PhD and numerous Masters students. He is currently Co-Investigator of several projects: the MicroPasts project with Prof. Andrew Bevan of UCL, Mapping the Palaeolithic with Nick Ashton and UCL and ‘From Museums to the Historic Environment’ with Professor Dan Hicks of Oxford University’s Pitt Rivers Museum. Other committee duties include CASPAR, HEIRNET, and he is the Chair of Discipline for Cambridge University Rugby Club. He is a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and of the Royal Geographical Society and is also a Research Associate of UCLDH.

Christine Szuter

Christine Szuter

Executive Director of the Amerind Foundation, Inc.

Christine Szuter is the executive director of the Amerind Foundation, Inc. Before arriving at Amerind she was the director of the graduate Scholarly Publishing Certificate program at Arizona State University in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Arizona specializing in Southwest archaeology and zooarchaeology. Her research interests include food systems, Indigenous studies, digital humanities, gender studies, scholarly publishing, and public history. She has served as the director of the University of Arizona Press where she collaborated with three other university presses on the First Peoples Initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and with six presses on the early stages of the Mellon-funded Archaeology of the Americas Digital Monograph Initiative. She has served on boards and committees for the Society for American Archaeology, American Association of University Presses, National Council for Public History, University of Arizona Digital Information Management (DigIn) Certificate program, Arizona State University Institute for Humanities Research Nexus Lab, Western National Park Association, and Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society.

 

Institute Directors

Ethan Watrall

Ethan Watrall

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology; Associate Director, MATRIX

An anthropological archaeologist who has worked throughout North America and the Middle East, Ethan Watrall is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology (anthropology.msu.edu) and Associate Director of MATRIX: The Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences (matrix.msu.edu) at Michigan State University. In addition, Ethan is Director of the Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative (chi.anthropology.msu.edu) and the Cultural Heritage Informatics Fieldschool (chi.anthropology.msu.edu/fieldschool) at Michigan State University. Currently, Ethan is Co-PI of the NEH funded ARCS: Archaeological Resource Cataloguing System project and the Director of the NEH funded Institute for Digital Archaeological Method and Practice. Ethan’s interest primarily fall in the domain of digital public archaeology and heritage, with particular interest in mobile digital public heritage and digital heritage mapping for public outreach and engagement. Ethan is co-editor of Archaeology 2.0: New Tools for Communication and Collaboration, an open access volume published by the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press

Lynne Goldstein

Lynne Goldstein

Professor of Anthropology, Michigan State University

Archaeologist and Professor (and former Chair) of Anthropology at Michigan State University, Goldstein has published articles on the precontact Mississippian period in the U.S. Eastern Woodlands, the analysis and meaning of mortuary practices, quantitative research methods, computer databases, social media strategies, and ethics and public policy in anthropology. Since 2005, a portion of her research has included the archaeology of university campuses; Goldstein created and directs Michigan State University’s unique Campus Archaeology Program, which conducts research and mitigation work on campus, as well as maintaining a high visibility social media presence.

Goldstein is currently Publications Director for the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association; she has also served as Editor of the journal American Antiquity, she is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and past Chair of its Anthropology Section; former Secretary of the Society for American Archaeology; member of the American Anthropological Association’s Committee on Public Policy; former member of the Smithsonian Institution Repatriation Review Committee; Fellow of the Society for Cultural Anthropology; and Past President of the Midwest Archaeological Conference.