YEAR 1 SCHEDULE

8:00 am
8:10 am
8:20 am
8:30 am
8:40 am
8:50 am
9:00 am
9:10 am
9:20 am
9:30 am
9:40 am
9:50 am
10:00 am
10:10 am
10:20 am
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10:50 am
11:00 am
11:10 am
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11:50 am
12:00 pm
12:10 pm
12:20 pm
12:30 pm
12:40 pm
12:50 pm
1:00 pm
1:10 pm
1:20 pm
1:30 pm
1:40 pm
1:50 pm
2:00 pm
2:10 pm
2:20 pm
2:30 pm
2:40 pm
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3:00 pm
3:10 pm
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4:00 pm
4:10 pm
4:20 pm
4:30 pm
4:40 pm
4:50 pm
5:00 pm
Monday (Aug 17)
Monday (Aug 17)
Check-In
8:00 am - 8:30 am

Opening Remarks, Institute Introduction, Logistical Information
8:30 am - 10:30 am

Break
10:30 am - 10:45 am

Introduction to Project Management for Digital Archaeology
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Ethan Watrall, Michigan State University

In this session, attendees will be introduced to best practices in project management for digital archaeology projects. Emphasis will be placed on low cost, low barrier approaches to digital project management (many of which have been pioneered in the digital humanities). Topics that will be covered include development models, scoping, schedule planning, creating a development workplan, budgeting, building a team, user research, design constrains, prototyping, team management, revision and version control systems, issue tracking, code management, and open source methods.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Introduction to Project Management for Digital Archaeology (Part II)
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm
Ethan Watrall, Michigan State University

In this session, attendees will be introduced to best practices in project management for digital archaeology projects. Emphasis will be placed on low cost, low barrier approaches to digital project management (many of which have been pioneered in the digital humanities). Topics that will be covered include development models, scoping, schedule planning, creating a development workplan, budgeting, building a team, user research, design constrains, prototyping, team management, revision and version control systems, issue tracking, code management, and open source methods.

Break
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Introduction to GitHub (Workshop)
2:45 pm - 4:30 pm
Ethan Watrall, Michigan State University

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to Github (www.github.com) as a social version control platform for digital archaeology and heritage projects. Included will be a discussion of GitHub's basic workflow (forking, cloning, committing, pull requests, etc). The workshop will also cover using GitHub for project management tool (wiki, issues, etc) and a hosting platform (GitHub Pages)

To Do

Read A Gentle Introduction to Version Control

Sign up for a GitHub account

Download GitHub client (Mac or Windows)

Read the Profhacker GitHub Guide: Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4

Day 1 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Tuesday (Aug 18)
Tuesday (Aug 18)
Introduction to Digital Libraries, Digital Archives, and Digital Repositories
8:30 am - 10:00 am
Catherine Foley, Michigan State University

Break
10:00 am - 10:15 am

Hands on with KORA Digital Repository Platform
10:15 am - 11:30 am
Catherine Foley, Michigan State University

This tutorial provides an overview of KORA, an open-source, database-driven, online digital repository application for complex multimedia objects (text, images, audio, video). A walk through the KORA backend will illustrate how the repository accommodates a variety of digital resource types and metadata schemes. Participants will also explore websites designed to present and disseminate digital collections stored in KORA. The tutorial will demonstrate how to create a project in KORA, populate that project with appropriate metadata schemes, label and define the metadata elements in those schemes, and finally how to upload digital files and related metadata into the system through a web data entry form. At the end of the session, participants will have the opportunity to apply what they have learned by creating and populating a test KORA database for a small selection of archaeological content.

Lunch
11:30 am - 1:15 pm

Linked Data in the Archaeological Wilds (Lecture)
1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
Daniel Pett, British Museum

This talk will focus on the use of Linked Open Data in the archaeological wild and will look at the successes and failures of various projects that have emerged in the last few years. It will look at the implementation of the CIDOC-CRM within the British Museum, the development of Nomisma and the success of projects such as Pelagios.

Break
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm

Fundamentals of Linked Open Data for Archaeology (Workshop)
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Daniel Pett, British Museum

A planned workshop will run through the basics of linked Open Data in the archaeological sector, looking at the core values and principles needed to understand the processes. It will then show participants how to align their own datasets (or those of others) to easily accessible resources such as Nomisma, the British Museum, the Ordnance Survey and emerging models. It will also discuss APIs and how they might also be of use (lower barrier for entry) and how these can be integrated into their own work.

Day 2 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Wednesday (Aug 19)
Wednesday (Aug 19)
Introduction to Web Mapping for Archaeology & Heritage (Lecture)
8:30 am - 9:30 am
Ethan Watrall, Michigan State University

In this lecture, attendees will be introduced to fundamental issues and concepts of creating interactive maps and rich spatial user experiences on the open web. Topics that will be discussed include the architecture of the geospatial web, web map services (open vs. closed, commercial vs. community), Javascript mapping libraries, no-cost vs. low cost solutions, geocoding, geoparsing, georectification, and spatial data in web maps. In addition, the lecture will introduce some of the thorny and complicated issues that attendees might encounter when building interactive web maps for archaeology and heritage.

Break
9:30 am - 9:45 am

Fundamentals of Building Web Maps (Workshop)
9:45 am - 11:30 am
Brian Geyer, Michigan State University

This workshop serves as a hands-on introduction to various, practical aspects of web mapping. Participants will use several open source tools to map a data set which contains geospatial attributes. Attendees will be encouraged to expand upon the workshop basics to tease out interesting facets of their dataset when mapped.

Lunch
11:30 am - 1:15 pm

Introduction to Archaeological Data Publishing
1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
Eric Kansa, Alexandria Archive Institute & Open Context

Archaeology, a discipline that often relies upon destructive methodologies, urgently needs to make data sharing and preservation an accepted norm. However, the realities of professional incentives and the lack of clear research outcomes based on shared data inhibit many from participating. To meet these needs, this session will introduce key concepts of a “data sharing as publication” model for data dissemination. The session will communicate some of our recent NEH / IMLS and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation supported efforts to better align Open Context’s (an open-access data publication system) data dissemination with professional needs. In 2010, following extensive user-needs evaluations, we began work to make Open Context a more formalized data publishing venue. Researchers wanted high-quality, professionally recognized venues to contribute toward, and they also required high-quality, citable datasets, ideally aligned to common disciplinary standards. In response, we secured archival services from the California Digital Library, one of the world’s leading digital repositories. We also recruited an editorial board and began work to develop software-assisted workflows to collaboratively improve data quality and standards alignment. The session will provide a high level overview of how data publication fits within the larger context of professional communications. In addition, the discussion will highlight how the “value-added” of editorially supervised data publication can help researchers participate in key Web standards, technologies and digital library archiving services. These standards include the intellectual property and technical requirements of “Linked Open Data”. Finally, Open Context’s model of data sharing as publication can be replicated and

Readings

Kansa EC, Kansa SW and Arbuckle B (2014) Publishing and Pushing: Mixing Models for Communicating Research Data in Archaeology. International Journal of Digital Curation9(1): 57–70. (Open Access: http://dx.doi.org/10.2218/ijdc.v9i1.301

Kansa, Eric (2012) Openness and archaeology's information ecosystem. World Archaeology 44(4): 498-520. (Open Access Preprint: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/9tq378jg)

Break
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm

Methods in Archaeological Data Publishing (Workshop)
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
Eric Kansa, Alexandria Archive Institute & Open Context

This workshop will have a “hands-on” and technical focus, demonstrating how publication processes can help improve the discoverability, reuse, and longevity of primary scholarly materials. The session will give participants an opportunity to act as a “Data Editor”, taking datasets through an entire publication workflow from submission to public dissemination and archiving. In this session, researchers will relate datasets with other data published on the Web, using Linked Open Data methods. The complex interdependencies between various parts of a large dataset and the software needed to use and interpret data require different quality control processes than seen in manuscript publishing. Editorial processes for improving data quality have many of the same requirements as editorial processes for improving software. Bug tracking can therefore be an important tool to support data publishing workflows. Participants will use our Data Refine System, integrating popular open-source applications (Google Refine and the Mantis Issue Tracker), that now supports Open Context’s publication workflows. The Data Refine System allows researchers and data editors to collaborate in the review, clean-up and documentation of datasets to prepare them for publication. In this process, researchers will also align parts of datasets to key shared vocabularies using Linked Open Data methods. The session will show participants how to use Google Refine’s Freebase entity reconciliation features, and the session will show participants how to reference entities in the Encyclopedia of Life and the Pleiades Gazetteer. Rather than working toward monolithic centralization, this session will show researchers how to participate in a growing and widely distributed humanities information ecosystem. Thus, the skills and perspectives shared in this session will help researchers how to best use the Web in general, not just Open Context in particular. Linked Open Data offers a powerful means to leverage distributed data for research applications. The session will illustrate how innovative publishing workflows will contribute to the Web of Data, give researchers recognition and rewards, and open new doors to exciting research opportunities.

Day 3 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Thursday (Aug 20)
Thursday (Aug 20)
Web Mapping Collaborative Rapid Dev Challenge Demos
8:30 am - 9:30 am

Each team will have 5 minutes to demo their web mapping rapid development challenge project.

Break
9:30 am - 9:45 am

Archaeological Scholarly Publication and Communication in the Public Digital Age (Lecture)
9:45 am - 10:45 am
Christine Szuter, Amerind Foundation

Digital archaeology is more than digitization. It is a way to ask different questions, solve intriguing problems, engage diverse audiences, and communicate research results in new arenas. The humanities encompass all the ways we experience being human. So although the juxtapositioning of technology and humanities can seem jarring or an ill-fit, the digital world actually complements the humanities. It changes the ways we conduct research, it allows us to stimulate all of our senses in the publication of our work, and it forces us to ask big-picture questions leading to the creation of large comparative works. Understanding how reading, researching, writing, and communicating have changed in a digital world will lead to the creation of news ways of thinking, organizing, and developing research topics and questions. Archaeologists are well-poised for this world because their work is highly interdisciplinary and collaborative. The digital platform will allow for them to expand this foundation and think more creatively about their research and the ways to communicate that work to diverse audiences.

Break
10:45 am - 11:00 am

Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (Lecture)
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association

What if the academic monograph is a dying form? If scholarly communication is to have a future, it’s clear that it lies online, and yet the most significant obstacles to such a transformation are not technological, but instead social and institutional. How must the academy and the scholars that comprise it change their ways of thinking in order for digital scholarly publishing to become a viable alternative to the university press book? This talk will explore some of those changes and their implications for our lives as scholars and our work within and without universities.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Digital Tools for Scholarly Publishing and Communication (Workshop)
1:15 pm - 2:45 pm
Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to several key tools for scholarly publishing and communication. Attendees will explore tools that are suitable for both born digital and print projects. Special emphasis will be placed on open source tools that are both easily installed and administered which allow scholars (of all kinds) to collaboratively manage the entire lifecycle of a project, from development to launch.

Break
2:45 pm - 3:00 pm

Where Does Social Media Fit Within Archeology? Why Should Archeologists Participate?
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Lynne Goldstein, Michigan State University
Terry Brock, Montpelier Foundation

This session will provide an overview of digital social media, then apply it to archaeology. The first component of the scan will examine what digital social media is, outline some of the primary social media tools, and discuss how they have been used within the primary spheres of business, entertainment, nonprofits, and marketing. The second part will discuss the potential and actual applications of digital social media to archaeology. We will examine case studies ranging from organizations to individual archaeologists who have successfully used social media in conjunction with archaeology. In this section, we will use the experience of Michigan State University’s Campus Archaeology Program to demonstrate both positive and negative results. The third component will address the advantages and disadvantages of implementing and using social media for archaeology. This will include a discussion of determining value for a project, necessary resources, training, security, and the protection of cultural resources.

Social Media Play Activity

To prepare for the social media session of the Institute, we would like you to begin experimenting with Facebook, Twitter, and a third social media type as representatives. You can sign up with these with your project’s name, or as something neutral. The objective is for you to begin “playing” with these technologies to understand what it is like to use them not as everyday personal users, but as operators of the accounts. This is the difference between using social media, and understanding how social media actually works. For your third account, try to select something that you think may be useful for your project or institution (So, if your project includes video, YouTube might be good, or perhaps a heavily visual project could benefit from Instagram or Pinterest).

Since you are learning, the intent here is not to use these accounts publicly. Settings can be put on Private. The only community you need to share them with are the other participants and instructors in the institute, by putting them on this Google Doc, along with your name. Other participants, please follow these pages and accounts, so that we can all “play” together.

Over the next few weeks, begin posting to these accounts, learning about what different types of posts and messages look like. Follow some other accounts that are similar to what you are interested to see what they are posting, how they are interacting in the space, and to learn the “language”.

Directions

Facebook: On Facebook, you will sign up for a Facebook Page. This requires you to already be a user of Facebook. Here are instructions: https://www.facebook.com/help/104002523024878

Twitter: Start a Twitter account: https://twitter.com/signup

Take the time to read the documentation on each of these sites to learn the basics. Investigate how to communicate, message, post, and also look at “analytics”. See how these social media can integrate with other media.

Visit the Google Doc and leave the URLs or handles for your accounts so that others can follow them. We will provide a list of other users of various social media sites that we believe are good models for use on this page as well (many of which we run ourselves!).

Day 4 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Friday (Aug 21)
Friday (Aug 21)
Augment Your Archaeology (Lecture)
8:30 am - 9:30 am
Shawn Graham, Carleton University

This session will provide an overview of current trends and state of the art in small-scale 3d imaging and augmented reality. By ‘small-scale’, I mean a single scholar or small team, working from a constrained budget. We will look at the hype of augmented reality, to focus on the ‘what’s in it for me?’ questions. We will examine case studies of effective – and ineffective – uses of augmented reality. 3d imagining and augmented reality have a natural home in public archaeology and outreach projects, but with the rise of the so-called ‘maker’ movement, the possibilities for 3d imagining and augmented reality to enhance research and data sharing are immense.

Readings

Eve, S; (2012) Augmenting phenomenology: using augmented reality to aid archaeological phenomenology in the landscape. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory , 19 (4) pp. 582-600. 10.1007/s10816-012-9142-7http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1352447/

Roosevelt, Christopher H., Peter Cobb, Emanuel Moss, Brandon R. Olson, and Sinan Ünlüsoy (2015) Excavation is Destruction Digitization: Advances in Archaeological Practice Journal of Field Archaeology 2015 40:3, 325-346 http://www.maneyonline.com/action/showCitFormats?doi=10.1179%2F2042458215Y.0000000004

Verdiani, Girogio. (2015)  Bringing Impossible Places to the Public: Three Ideas for Rupestrian Churches in Goreme, Kapadokya Utilizing a Digital Survey, 3D Printing, and Augmented Reality Open Archaeology 1.1.  http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/opar.2014.1.issue-1/opar-2015-0007/opar-2015-0007.xml?format=INT

Break
9:30 am - 9:45 am

Getting Started with Augmented Reality in Archeology (Workshop)
9:45 am - 12:00 pm
Shawn Graham, Carleton University

This tutorial provides an overview of a simple workflow in structure-from-motion photogrammetry, bringing participants through the necessary steps to ‘digitize’ a physical object. Participants would try various free (proprietary) and open-source tools to render their objects; discussion would centre around not just the technical aspects of this work but also the open-access and intellectual property issues. Participants would then upload their models to a variety of platforms for web-based Augmented Reality (Sketchfab for instance supports annotating digital objects, as well as the Oculus Rift 3d Headset; combined with a Leap Motion Detector, one can then manipulate virtual 3d objects by hand.) Print based AR, image-based AR, and various museological and interpretive use-cases will be explored.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Open Critical Play, Experimentation, Collaboration, Discussion
1:15 pm - 4:30 pm

This is an open & unstructured session in which attendees will have the opportunity to play/experiment with the tools, techniques, methods, and equipment that they might not have gotten the opportunity to experience thus far in the institute. It is also an opportunity for attendees to set down and talk with institute faculty (and other, fellow attendees) about their final project. This session is also an opportunity for attendees to prepare their lightning project presentation.

Day 5 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Saturday (Aug 22)
Saturday (Aug 22)
Final Day Opening Remarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

Lightning Institute Project Presentations
9:00 am - 10:15 am

In this session, each attendee will have 5 minutes (max) to quickly present and discuss their proposed final institute project.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

Lightning Institute Project Presentations (Part II)
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

In this session, each attendee will have 5 minutes (max) to quickly present and discuss their proposed final institute project.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Project Consultations
1:15 pm - 4:00 pm

In this session, attendee will have an opportunity to consult with institute faculty on their proposed final project. The intended outcome for this session is a formal project proposal.

Year 1 Wrap Up/Interim Year Planning
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Day 6 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm