YEAR 2 SCHEDULE

We are very happy to welcome attendees to the campus of Michigan State University from August 15-20 for the second phase of the NEH funded Institute for Digital Archaeology Method & Practice.  Unless otherwise stated, all institute activities will take place in LEADR – which is located in 112 Old Horticulture.

Click on the individual schedule items below for additional details (session description, required session readings, associated tools, session pre-requisites, etc).

Portions of the institute (faculty talks, etc) will be streamed here: https://www.youtube.com/user/matrixMSU

8:00 am
8:10 am
8:20 am
8:30 am
8:40 am
8:50 am
9:00 am
9:10 am
9:20 am
9:30 am
9:40 am
9:50 am
10:00 am
10:10 am
10:20 am
10:30 am
10:40 am
10:50 am
11:00 am
11:10 am
11:20 am
11:30 am
11:40 am
11:50 am
12:00 pm
12:10 pm
12:20 pm
12:30 pm
12:40 pm
12:50 pm
1:00 pm
1:10 pm
1:20 pm
1:30 pm
1:40 pm
1:50 pm
2:00 pm
2:10 pm
2:20 pm
2:30 pm
2:40 pm
2:50 pm
3:00 pm
3:10 pm
3:20 pm
3:30 pm
3:40 pm
3:50 pm
4:00 pm
4:10 pm
4:20 pm
4:30 pm
4:40 pm
4:50 pm
5:00 pm
5:10 pm
5:20 pm
5:30 pm
5:40 pm
5:50 pm
6:00 pm
6:10 pm
6:20 pm
6:30 pm
6:40 pm
6:50 pm
7:00 pm
7:10 pm
7:20 pm
7:30 pm
7:40 pm
7:50 pm
8:00 pm
Monday (Aug 15)
Monday (Aug 15)
Check-In
8:00 am - 8:30 am

Opening Remarks, Institute Introduction, Logistical Information
8:30 am - 10:30 am

Break
10:30 am - 10:45 am

Project Update Presentations
10:45 am - 12:00 pm

10 minute presentations from each institute member. Will provide everyone an opportunity to show where they are in the project, talk about what they did over the past year, and what they need to get done before launch at the end of the institute. The presentations also ensure that everyone knows where everyone else is on their projects. The presentations also provide an opportunity for faculty and mentors to figure out where and how they can contribute to the successful completion and launch of all the institute projects.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Project Update Presentations (Part 2)
1:15 pm - 2:30 pm

10 minute presentations from each institute member. Will provide everyone an opportunity to show where they are in the project, talk about what they did over the past year, and what they need to get done before launch at the end of the institute. The presentations also ensure that everyone knows where everyone else is on their projects. The presentations also provide an opportunity for faculty and mentors to figure out where and how they can contribute to the successful completion and launch of all the institute projects.

Break
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Project Update Presentations (Part 3)
2:45 pm - 4:30 pm

10 minute presentations from each institute member. Will provide everyone an opportunity to show where they are in the project, talk about what they did over the past year, and what they need to get done before launch at the end of the institute. The presentations also ensure that everyone knows where everyone else is on their projects. The presentations also provide an opportunity for faculty and mentors to figure out where and how they can contribute to the successful completion and launch of all the institute projects.

Day 1 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Tuesday (Aug 16)
Tuesday (Aug 16)
Day 2 Opening REmarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

Archive of Malian Photography — Project Background and Intellectual Property Considerations
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Catherine Foley, Michigan State University

For this talk, I will describe the development and goals of the Archive of Malian Photography, a British Library and NEH-funded project to provide access to preserved & digitized collections of five important photographers in Mali. Since 2011, under the leadership of Professor Candace Keller, a collaborative team of US and Malian conservators has been cleaning, scanning, cataloging, and rehousing circa 100,000 photographic negatives from the archives of Mamadou Cissé, Adama Kouyaté, Abdourahmane Sakaly, Malick Sidibé, and Tijani Sitou for long-term preservation and world-wide access. The talk will also touch on intellectual property (IP) considerations specifically copyrights held over the materials in the Archive of Malian Photography. It will explain decisions made by project collaborators related to Creative Commons licenses for the metadata and distribution files and the process of drafting a Partnership Agreement that articulates Duties and Responsibilities of the partners. From the outset, IP issues influenced the implementation of the Archive of Malian Photography due to a history of exploitation of African heritage materials, in particular the illegal and/or unethical acquisition in photographic negatives and the unauthorized reproduction of images without the consent of photographers.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

3D in Museums; Museums in 3D
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Dan Pett, British Museum

In this presentation, we'll demonstrate the burgeoning world of 3D in the Bloomsbury museum area. It will discuss the development of 3D practise and implementation in the Museum environment and discuss different printing methodologies, with some models for handling. It will also touch on the Museum in a Box project, which is updating the well-known idea of handling collections and museum outreach with 3D printing and Internet of Things to create a fun, tactile and multi-sensory box of museum objects designed to engage and delight kids across the UK.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Daily Project Scrum
1:15 pm - 1:45 pm

Answer 3 questions: (1) What did you do yesterday to move you project forward, (2) What are you doing today to move your project forward, and (3) is there anything specific that is standing in the way of moving your project forward.

Project Development Time
1:45 pm - 4:30 pm

Work on your project!

Day 2 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Wednesday (Aug 17)
Wednesday (Aug 17)
Day 3 Opening Remarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

#Failing Productively in Digital Archaeology
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Shawn Graham, Carleton University

Fail fast, fail often! It's a ridiculous slogan. Even - if 30 seconds on Google is any judge - even the software folks are becoming a bit leery of saying it. Failure (real failure) carries significant risks to careers, to projects, to our emotional wellbeing. I have long encouraged my students and colleagues to 'fail gloriously', to take risks, to try something different. To push. To resist. Even then, 'fail' was not to be understood in the sense of 'failure'. Rather, it meant to iterate (but 'Iterate Gloriously' just doesn't have the same ring to it). The heart of science is falsifiability, the imperative to reproduce research and to fail; fear of fail holds us all back. Imposter Syndrome will rear its ugly head. In this presentation, I explore a taxonomy of different kinds of 'fails', drawing on examples from my own very public fails, and their implications for how we do digital archaeology. I explore what these mean in both within and without the classroom. Unless, of course, I fail.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

Delivering the Baby, Then What?
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Dan Pett, British Museum

This presentation will address getting a project to delivery point using project management techniques; how you can overcome potential impasses through lateral thinking; the application of digital sticky tape or triage and a release early and release often philosophy. Once your project has been delivered, what next? Do you go home with a crying baby, or do you work out how to soothe and maintain the status quo? Using anecdotal evidence from a variety of project that the presenter has worked upon, discussion will be prompted on what could work for MSUDAI projects.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Daily Project Scrum
1:15 pm - 1:45 pm

Answer 3 questions: (1) What did you do yesterday to move you project forward, (2) What are you doing today to move your project forward, and (3) is there anything specific that is standing in the way of moving your project forward.

Project Development Time.
1:45 pm - 4:30 pm

Work on your project!

Day 3 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Thursday (Aug 18)
Thursday (Aug 18)
Day 4 Opening Remarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

Marketing Digital Archaeology: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Eric Kansa, Alexandria Archive Institute & Open Context

Evgeny Morozov recently criticized Internet utopianism in his influential book, To Save Everything, Click Here (2014). His points offer a valuable perspective in considering the development of Digital Archaeology, a field that often demands the commoditization, marketing, and branding of scholarship “as a service”. In face of these pressures, how can we better sustain substantive and reflective intellectual engagement with a digitized past? Digital engagement requires much longer time scales in funding and greater professional commitment to recognizing the process and conduct of research rather than rewarding only the efficient production of measurable research outcomes.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

Not all Networks: Toward Open, Sustainable Research Communities
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA

The recent sale of the Social Science Research Network to Elsevier, and the recent efforts of Academia.edu to find a revenue model in peer review, have at long last highlighted for the scholarly communication landscape something that’s been visible in other forms of social media for a while: when it comes to networks, openness is a virtue, but other determinants matter as much or more. This talk will explore the importance for the future of network-based scholarly communication of developing open, sustainable scholarly communities, and the necessity that those communities be mission-driven and scholar-governed. My argument will be grounded in my work on Humanities Commons, an interdisciplinary scholarly network being developed by the Modern Language Association in partnership with several other humanities-based learned societies. Together, we are working to build a network that will be open to any interested scholar while providing particular benefits for the members of the participating societies. What may be most important about Humanities Commons is precisely that it is being developed and supported by scholarly societies: first, because those societies were originally founded for the express purpose of supporting communication amongst their members, and second, because those societies are member-governed. As a result, the network that these societies are working to launch will not simply be open, but will be mission-driven, ensuring that the network’s development has serving its members’ needs as its primary goal. Ensuring that a network such as Humanities Commons can succeed, however, requires its members to be willing to support and sustain the platforms that facilitate their work. The development of truly open, mission-driven scholarly communities will thus require that societies and scholars alike embrace a shift in the locus of value in joining a scholarly society: rather than that value residing in the receipt of member-only materials (journal subscriptions; convention registration discounts), in the age of scholarly networks the primary value in membership may instead lie in the ability to participate in community conversations and processes. This finally implies what may be the most crucial shift of all, a deep rethinking of what it is we mean when we call a form of scholarly communication “open”; too many of our experiments in open scholarly communication (whether open-access publishing or open networks) have gotten trapped in the market-based logics of APCs and VC funding. Open, sustainable scholarly communities will require us to develop an alternative intellectual economy, a collectivist network that scholars both support and lead.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Campus Archaeology Tour
1:15 pm - 3:00 pm

work on your project!

Project Development Time
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Day 4 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Friday (Aug 19)
Friday (Aug 19)
Day 5 Opening Remarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

Promoting A Digital Project: Identifying, Targeting, and Engaging Your Audience
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Terry Brock, Montpelier Foundatio

This presentation will focus on the best practices and strategies to develop ongoing engagement with your audience through your digital project using social media tools and strategies.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

Teaching Digital Literacy and Skills in the Heritage Classroom
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Brian Geyer, Michigan State University

LEADR's goal is to instill in our students the digital skills relevant to being digitally literate and competitively trained for the workforce. We also strive to promote the use of digital technologies in the social sciences, including in cultural heritage projects. This talk will overview how we develop digital technology projects for use in heritage courses for undergraduates, the approaches we take in partnering with faculty (who may be resistant to utilizing digital tools in either research or courses), and strategies we employ while teaching specific skills. I will also discuss some of the common pitfalls we have encountered and ways we have dealt with them.

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Daily Project Scrum
1:15 pm - 1:45 pm

Project Development Time
1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

NEH and Future Funding Opportunties
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Project Development Time
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Day 5 Wrap Up
4:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Institute Dinner
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Saturday (Aug 20)
Saturday (Aug 20)
Final Day Opening Remarks
8:30 am - 9:00 am

Publishing Strategies that Fit Individual Needs: A Focus on Creating the World Where You Want to Be
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Christine Szuter, Amerind Foundation; Lynne Goldstein, Michigan State University

As a scholar—whether working in the academy, a nonprofit organization, a government institution, or the corporate world—a major responsibility is creating new knowledge that is disseminated to specific audiences in one’s professional life. Those audiences can range from narrow, specialized ones to a larger public eager to know more. Publishing is no longer solely relegated to print on paper in any field, so the incorporation of digital publishing strategies is a critical way to enhance and enlarge audiences leading to career satisfaction and advancement. These strategies cannot be universally applied, but must be thoughtfully considered depending on one’s current career, desired future work, available time and money, work styles, and personal situations. The presenters will discuss individual publishing strategies for the participants that reflect these considerations: their current profession, their future career desires, and the realities of their personal lives. The focus will be on digital publishing strategies for archaeological scholarship that reach multiple and diverse audiences. The presenters will prepare some general thoughts on publication and long-term preservation and then will tailor their comments to the participants’ projects completed for the Institute.

Break
10:15 am - 10:30 am

Final Project Scrum
10:30 am - 10:45 am

Project Development Time
10:45 am - 12:00 pm

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Project Development, Project Launch!
1:15 pm - 3:00 pm

Project Launch, Institute Reflection, Institute Wrap Up
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm